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House fire in U.S is triggered by pillow and electric heater

Another house fire took place in the U.S this week as a result of an electric heater.

Fire fighters rushed to the Jersey City home on Tuesday afternoon after an electric heater caused a pillow to catch on fire.

The electric heater’s power accidently came on when electricity was restored in the house. Prior to the fire, the homes electricity was off because of a power outage.

Fire fighters managed to put the fire out after one of them found smoke coming from the basement of the building where the fire occurred.

It has been assumed that the pillow was placed next to the heater by someone in the house without them knowing that the heater was still plugged in.

November 11, 2012 at 12:00 pm | electric heaters |
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Investigation planned in Australia over faulty heating systems

Fears have arisen in Australia over faults with gas heating, insulation and ventilation in homes built during the 1990s.

Following the deaths of two young boys in May 2010, a coroner has said that she wants to examine heating systems as well as ventilation in Aussie homes in order to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning related deaths in the future.

She said that she intends to examine a number of factors including the heaters, house ventilation and exhaust fans.

The two young boys that were killed by a carbon monoxide leak from a bedroom heater, may have been victims of faulty heating and a lack of ventilation.

The heater was said to be covered in soot, which raises carbon monoxide levels and the well-sealed doors and windows meant that the house was not properly ventilated. An exhaust fan also posed as a hazard for the boys, as a lack of ventilation means that the fan encouraged the carbon monoxide to spread.

The coroner fears that similar features are common across other houses built throughout the 1990s and it is suspected that a number of houses may have been built with similar difficulties in areas nearby.

The investigation of the homes is set to take place in March next year.

November 9, 2012 at 10:00 am | Gas heater |
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Fire Marshal confirms that heater caused house fire

A U.S fire marshal has confirmed that a house fire that took place last Thursday was caused by wall-mounted heater that fell on the floor.

The fire marshal spoke out about the investigation on Monday, saying that the heater, measuring around 2 by 2 and a half feet, was found detached from the wall.

The wall heater was a gas powered appliance and it is unclear as to whether it fell on the floor before or after the fire.

Fire departments received calls regarding the fire around 4am on Thursday morning.

November 7, 2012 at 1:39 pm | Gas heater |
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Consumer Reports do safety tests on space heaters

It’s the time of year where sales for space heaters are on the up to help keep people warm during the chilly winter months.

Because these self-contained portable devices cause around 1,700 house fires per year as well as approximately 70 deaths, Consumer Reports decided to test which ones may be the safest to use in the home.

After testing 19 portable electric heaters, they decided what the obvious risks were. They checked for suitable safeguards, which are a must, and they assessed whether the overheat sensor turns the heater off before it poses as a fire risk.

Consumer Reports used test fabric to see if the heat sensors were activated in time.

Following their tests they found that the Optimus H-5210 space heater’s sensor did not activate in time and the fabric caught fire within minutes of being placed on the unit.

The non-profit organisation did find that this mode came with a ‘Risk of fire’ warning on purchase.

However they confirmed that there was a potential safety problem when purchasing this model as it was the only one out of the 19 that they had tested that caught fire.

No matter which heater you use, CR urges everyone to keep fabrics and combustibles away from heaters at all times.

November 5, 2012 at 4:47 pm | electric heaters |
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Electric heater causes house fire in U.S

The Daytona Beach Fire Department in the U.S has said that a house fire was the result of an electric heater problem.

The fire, which took place on Tuesday morning at 5am, generated heavy smoke and flames that came from the house.

Fire fighters arrived at the scene and were able to contain the blaze to the rear bedroom of the home.

They were able to minimise damage to the house after the heater malfunctioned in the bedroom where the fire began.

Sparks were said to have been coming out of the heater shortly before the fire began. Luckily there were no injuries as a result of the fire.

As a result of the fire, the U.S Fire Administration want to remind people to check the wiring on all electric heaters to make sure it is installed incorrectly, as well as check for overloaded circuits and extension cords.

November 3, 2012 at 10:00 am | electric heaters |
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Mother raises awareness after her sons are killed by gas heater leak

Two Australian children who were killed by toxic, odourless carbon-monoxide fumes, which leaked from a gas heater in their home, have had their memory cherished by their mother.

The incident took place in May 2010, and the boys’ parents have since started an awareness campaign to improve gas and fossil fuel safety in Australian homes.

The mother woke up in a daze at the time of the leak. Her arm was limp and she could not wake the boys.

The leak has left her with on-going medical problems including memory loss and damage to her heat and liver.

The 31 year old named the foundation after her sons, Chase and Tyler. She is strongly passionate about raising awareness regarding carbon-monoxide poisoning caused by home appliances, such as a gas heater. She urges people to buy gas detectors, in order to save lives.

November 1, 2012 at 10:00 am | Gas heater |
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How to keep your home efficiently warm this winter!

During winter you’ll want to make sure that your home is energy efficient, as well as find a way to cut your energy costs as best as you can.

Leaking windows, poorly insulated water heaters and clogged air filters are all a potential killer for your energy costs, and with Christmas coming up you don’t want to have all your money tied up in keeping the house warm!

When you have the heating on at home make sure that you don’t let heat leak outside, you don’t want your money to be wasted nor do you want to increase your carbon footprint for no reason.

Check for window frames, door frames, outside vents to your dryer, baseboards, and spaces around window air conditioning units – this way you can be sure that you are properly insulated.

Insulation is essential for keeping out cold air, so that your home has natural warmth inside.

It’s also handy to check your air filters, to make sure they are fully clear and heating your home easily. Insulating your water heater could be another savvy way to cut your energy costs.

Water heating is usually around 14% to 25% of your heating costs, and by wrapping your water heater you could lower costs, as it will keep more heat within the appliance. This means that you’ll only pay for exactly what you should be paying for when your water bill comes through.

October 30, 2012 at 10:32 am | Water heater |
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Government funded heating system is more expensive than first thought

Heating systems in the UK that are said to be more efficient than usual have left families struggling to pay the bills.

The heating system used in the new government-funded affordable housing is said to be costing up to four times more than expected.

The heat is generated by an ‘exhaust air source heat pump’ that takes heat from waste air that leaves the house and then pumps it back in. This then provides heating and hot water.

Families are now said to have paid three to four times more than what the estimates said the new heating system would cost.

Energy Performance Certificates that accompanied the new properties estimated electricity and heating costs would be around £400 – £500 a year, but one resident’s electricity bill alone came through at £252 for just under 2 months. This led her to believe that the energy systems are not as cost efficient as the estimates suggested.

October 28, 2012 at 9:00 am | Heater costs |
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Are flueless fires safe?

Flueless fires provide heat and fire in a room that has no chimney, pipe or a duct to provide somewhere for the gases produced to be distributed.

They can be fitted in most rooms as long as they have a 100 square centimetre air vent that is one metre from the fire and as long as the room has a window that opens.

Flueless fires are gas heaters, which means they produce water vapour and carbon dioxide, as well as carbon monoxide if oxygen is in short supply.

This can be unsafe as there is no flue to direct these gases outside, which means they can leak out in the house. Water vapour causes condensation and humidity inside, carbon dioxide causes sleepiness and carbon monoxide is a serious risk to the health of anyone who is inhaling it.

This supports the argument that flueless fires may not be the safest option for standard home living. They are similar to gas cookers that have no ventilation above them, which are regularly used in many homes. However, flueless fires a likely to be used for longer periods of time than a gas cooker, which means a larger amount of unsafe gases will be distributed into the home.

If a fire with a flue can be fitted into the home, it is often a safer choice to go with as you can enjoy your cosy fire without having to worry about being poisoned at any period of time!

October 26, 2012 at 11:00 am | Gas heater |
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Things to remember when buying a portable heater

There are a few checks that you should keep in mind when you’re out shopping for a portable heater.

It’s always important to take your safety into consideration, which is why if you remember just a few things you will reduce your risk of an electric heater related fire this winter.

You should only ever buy a portable heater with a suitable safeguard. This slows down the risk of fire and means that nothing can touch the electric heating directly.

You should also always check the box for warning signs to see if they are a potential fire hazard. The warning should tell you to keep combustible materials at least 3 feet away from the heater.

Things like furniture, bedding and curtains should be kept at bay for reassurance of safety.

It’s also essential for to get a portable heater that is the correct size for the area you wish to place it in, leaving the required space in between the heater and any combustibles.

If you can get one with a tip over safety switch that would be best, because that way you can be sure that even when accidents occur you’re still not at risk of experiencing a fire.

October 24, 2012 at 9:43 am | electric heaters |
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